Designing Presence: Motorcycling and the GPS

My partner and I vacation by traversing the West on two wheels. Two years ago I bought a Garmin 76C handheld to improve my skills as the Navigator. The first time I used it while motorcycling, I was blown away. That little moving dot on the map screen was US on the ROAD. Wow! And hey, I can look up where the next gas station is. Cool! This device represents a particularly powerful form of technological presence that is mostly fabulous.

Say we’re riding over a curvacious mountain pass and we get caught behind a pack of slow moving Harley’s. (Sadly this happens all too often.) Well I can zoom into our location and discover that after two more curves is a long straight-away. Reporting this to the Captain allows her to relax her passing vigilance a bit, knowing the opportunity will come soon enough. (We passed 7 in one fell swoop last Friday. If only the Harley boys knew that two ladies were zooming by… )

Another great use is tracking mileage and distances for our rather weeny fuel tank capacity. Since the bike has no fuel gauge it’s up to us to keep track of when to fuel up again. It’s fabulous to be able to see that the next town is precisely 35.67 miles away.

But as anyone who has used a GPS long will tell you, don’t rely too heavily on the Garmin mapSource in data. This is true for both directions (turn left on Miller St. Ooops – it’s a one way!) and for looking up services like gas stations and Starbucks. (Ooops – that Starbucks was actually on Columbia DRIVE not Columbian WAY.) The weirdest part of the GPS’s inaccuracies is how it challenges you to override your human senses and believe the technology, putting faith into a machine over human intelligence and intuition. It took me about a year of using one to stop trusting the device when my perceptions were telling me otherwise.

What I do now is look up a lot of information on the web and program it into the GPS before leaving on a trip. Thus I discovered an incredible little coffee house in the tiny town of Harlowton, Montana and was able to guide us to it — as the GPS had no data what so ever about this part of the state. But since you can’t know in advance what all your needs will be in all locations at all times — one can text message Google (46645) and request a search. For example: “Missoula, MT Starbucks.” A few moments later a text message from Google provides the locations of two Starbucks and I had time to program one into the GPS in transit, guiding us to the correct spot. This technique, although cumbersome for using two devices, is much more trustworthy and accurate then Garmin’s MapSource. (Which didn’t show either Starbucks.)

That is — as long as your in cell range. 😉

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